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God Is Love

The Loving King

A prominent king had a very important message to send to his subjects.  So he sent a very trusted aide who was sharp, witty and holds the king in very high regard.  The aide, Selfio, would rather kill himself than not carry out the king’s command of delivering the message as the king intended.

 

The king’s message however contained technical aspects.  The messenger, unfortunately, had no technical training or experience.  The king considered sending other messengers with more technical skills, but he felt they would be flawed in the humane delivery of this most important message his subjects needed to hear and implement.  After careful consideration, the king decided to remain with his original choice to send the trusted messenger, Selfio, to deliver the message to his subjects.

 

Well, Selfio did a fantastic job.  With great dedication he delivered the message to the best of his understanding and abilities.

 

As time went by, the king’s subjects began to notice what appeared to be “gaps” in the message Selfio delivered.  The message did not appear to contain deliberate untruths but it did appear that in their zeal to get the message thoroughly understood, some unfortunate choices were made either by Selfio or the scribes who subsequently wrote down the message.   These choices lead to gaps of unclear briefing, gaps of missing information, gaps of inconclusive evidence, and so on.

 

Now with Selfio long gone, the subjects send supplications to the king, asking how this could have happened.  “You are the king,” they grumbled, “you know us and you know everything that goes on in your kingdom, how come we have a flawed message?”

 

The king sent back a response that his message was profound but the messenger and scribes were human who did the best they could through their human “filters.”  The king assured his subjects not to worry, adding, “just don’t get too hung up on the problem areas of the message, only do the best you can with the positive aspects of the message.”

 

Too late!  Some of the king’s learned subjects figured out how to impose subjective meanings to the “gaps” and some other segments of the king’s message.  Furthermore, they figured out how to use their subjective impositions to yoke other subjects, putting themselves above the essence of the whole message.  On paper, they were right in the eyes of man but in truth, everyone knew they were not abiding by the fundamental intent of the king’s message.  It did not matter for they had become a law unto themselves.

 

The loving king then sent his son with a much simpler, very direct message; love one another.  Nothing complicated about this message.  Surely his subjects cannot get this message wrong.   But get it wrong they did.  Even as the son proclaimed his father’s message, “a new commandment I bring unto you that you love one another…,” the subjects resisted the simple message, saying “it cannot be true, it cannot have come from the king.”  They even declared, “this cannot be the son of the king.”  They proceeded to take apart the simple message of the son, rearranged and interpreted it in all sorts of manner of ways so that now it resembled the message of the king’s first messenger, Selfio, with gaps and all.  Such confusion!

 

Fortunately, enough of the son’s original message got out to enough people who had the ears to hear it and the heart to receive it.  His words took root in clusters of communities in the kingdom.  Persecuted by the naysayers, some of the communities were forced to go underground for a period of time.

 

Slowly, however, the true message of the king, through his son, continued spreading and building momentum.  With time all the kingdom got the message: Love one another.  Love is of God.  God is love.  Nothing is impossible with love.

 

Spreading Communities of people who understand

the pure message of the Son

 

 

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